Alberta Mirror

Wednesday, July 6, 2022

Edmonton Oilers sue insurers for $174M over ‘huge’ pandemic losses

Alberta

Key takeaways: 

  • So far, all insurance claims have been rejected.
  • The lawsuit states Rogers Place Arena is in a high-density area and that multiple people carried the COVID-19 virus in and onto the property.

The Edmonton Oilers and its associated firms are suing four insurance firms for what’s explained in a statement of a lawsuit filed with the Court of Queen’s Bench as “massive business losses” over two years during the pandemic.  

On March 12, 2020, the NHL ended its season. Soon after, compulsory government orders kept fans, consumers, and customers from entering or using the Rogers Place arena. 

The case, filed March 16, 2022, states the COVID-19 virus physically changed the interior air, surfaces, and interior of Rogers Place, “making them unsuitable for their intentional use.”  The insurers, say the complainants, have decided “viruses do not induce physical loss or damage.”

Read more: The Red Bench supports women developing abilities confidence for professional trades

The case, filed March 16, 2022, states the COVID-19 virus physically changed the interior air, surfaces, and interior of Rogers Place

The notice of claim means that if the Oilers organization had let fans back into the structure in 2020 and 2021, “it is an assurance that COVID-19 and the COVID-19 virus would have been reintroduced in large amounts into those insured locations and additional and actual physical loss and damage would have persisted.”

According to the court document, most COVID-19 in the region reached “materially harmful levels” that were understated early in the pandemic due to limited testing and contract tracing. 

“The fact of COVID-19 and the COVID-19 virus in the plaintiffs’ facilities made the regular use of those facilities unattainable for nearly two years,” the court document states, adding that the structure is in a high-density location and contiguous to an LRT station, resulting in “multiple infectious individuals” having the virus in and onto their properties by “breathing, talking, coughing, shouting and touching.”

Source – cbc.ca

Show More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.