Alberta Mirror

Wednesday, August 10, 2022

Edmonton is stumbling to find funding to conduct specialized housing-teams for homeless-citizens

Alberta

Key takeaways: 

  • The future of 300 units is in limbo as the city requires $9M a year the region didn’t finance in budget.
  • The supportive housing complex in Wellington is one of the city’s five tasks this year and is slated to extend to tenants in the spring.

Alberta looking for funds: 

The fate of almost 300 flat units in Edmonton for individuals transitioning from chronic homelessness is in limbo since the latest regional budget has no grant to conduct new permanent supportive housing tasks.

The City of Edmonton requested the region to operate the specialized accommodation for $9 million a year, five buildings presently under the building and slated to open this spring. 

Two hotels are being transformed into permanent accommodation for 348 units by June. 

Mayor Amarjeet Sohi stated he relied on those operating dollars, the minimum needed to run the facilities.

“We will be running to run those, or they will stay empty,” Sohi said after the funding was released the previous week. “That is a tragedy.” 

Read more: Alberta to spend $300M on further crucial care beds

The City of Edmonton struggles to find funds to develop a specialized team

Housing agencies, nevertheless, are bound to find the funds.

Susan McGee, CEO of housing steward Homeward Trust, stated the complexes were created and made especially for individuals transitioning from chronic homelessness with mental health and addictions problems. 

“We don’t expect a future where they’re left empty,” McGee expressed in an interview Thursday. “But it’s not going to be easy to make them perform, for sure.” 

Homeward Trust is answerable for securing the funds and choosing agencies to use the permanent supportive accommodation, which needs staff on-site 24/7 to aid tenants with a range of services, including mental health and addictions help. 

She stated the average complex requires a match of 11 full-time teams, costing approximately $1 to $1.2 million a year.

Source – cbc.ca

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