Alberta Mirror

Monday, October 3, 2022

Expectancies for a long-term contract between Crown prosecutors province stall out

Alberta

Key takeaways: 

  • Negotiations continue for a short-term contract, says the head of the Alberta Crown Attorneys’ Association.
  • Alberta Crown Attorneys’ Association president Dallas Sopko flanked by other prosecutors at the Edmonton Law Courts building in May after the region approved negotiating on a new framework.
  • Six weeks after, no new deal has been struck. 

The head of the Alberta Crown Attorneys’ Association says expectancies for a long-term deal with the region have been delayed because the government will not acknowledge the ACAA as the single voice for Alberta’s about 400 Crown prosecutors.

“In the lack of that, it’s just unworkable to enter into a framework contract for a lengthy period,” ACAA president Dallas Sopko said Friday.

“Our association is unhappy; our members are aggrieved in that. That was our anticipation when this process began.”

In May, Justice Minister Tyler Shandro decided to a six-week negotiation with the association after it intimidated to strike over what it described as too low wages, overwhelming workloads, and a lack of mental health help.

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The head of the Alberta Crown Attorneys’ Association says expectancies for a long-term deal with the region have been delayed because the government will not acknowledge the ACAA as the single voice for Alberta’s about 400 Crown prosecutors

Shandro decided to increase prosecutor pays to get them in line with other jurisdictions and to sit down with the association to discuss a long-term framework deal.

Sopko once said that many senior Crown prosecutors have left the service over working conditions and that drafting and having new prosecutors is hard.

He said most areas in Canada have framework contracts with their prosecution services and that it would offer long-term stability for the Alberta service. 

Sopko stated the long-term frameworks could last for decades and set out who the parties are, what powers they each have strategies for settling disputes, and processes for what happens if the parties can’t come to shorter-term contracts about wages and other problems.

Source – CBC News

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